The Weeknd’s Drunk in Love

I’ve never been a huge fan of the vocal ability of The Weeknd. In fact, he kind of sounds like Beiber at times. Or I guess I should say, Beiber totally ripped off The Weeknd’s vocal style. Seriously, check the two out and compare, especially with Justin’s new joint, “Confident.” Maybe it’s a Canadian thing I missed out on. But The Weeknd represents this new crop of r&b that is more rough and dirty lyrically. Not so much about love, but about fucking. No romance at all. At times, his music is right up my alley (wink). Other times, not so much. However, this remix remake kind of fits The Weeknd. So he took it over. And ran with it. Best part is it’s FREE. Download it while you can. He does a solid job at remixing it. Kudos Week. Now go have sex. And turn this up loudly.

https://soundcloud.com/theweekndxo/drunk-in-love-the-weeknd-remix?utm_source=soundcloud&utm_campaign=widgetshare&utm_medium=facebook&utm_content=http%3A%2F%2Fsoundcloud.com%2Ftheweekndxo%2Fdrunk-in-love-the-weeknd-remix

This is The Remix.

I grew up in the 90s at a time when remixes were very very popular. They pretty much provided the artist a chance to expand their fan base and attain possibly new listeners. Remixes were usually a more danceable beat with the artist’s voice on top. Same song, different beat. I lived for a remix. In the 90s..particularly in r&b music, remixes were just damn good. A lot of times, the remixes were better than the album versions. So much so that record labels started to include remixes on the artist’s cds to appease those who were beatheads more so than music lyrical fanatics. I myself was one of those beat fanatics. I wanted to be a remixer when I got out of college. I still think there is an area for this type of music. As I’ve gotten older I think a lot of songs by artists I like could use a face lift in the form of the mix of re.

Nowadays, record labels just stick a rapper on a track, leave everything else untouched, and call it a remix. But that is so NOT a remix. When I think of rearranging a song..I think of rearranging a tempo, a chord progression, throw in an album scratch here and there..maybe break apart the vocals. Give it a complete makeover but never changing how a song is sung. I’d leave that in tact. I don’t understand why more labels don’t try this again. I mean in the 90s just about everyone had someone remix their song. And some bands even went so far as to release a whole remix album – a companion to the original album. Bell Biv DeVoe for example, put out a cd called “WBBD: Bootcity. The Remix Album.” And it was a classic. Perfect combo of dance and r&b and street. I still listen to it today. I mean, the tracks are on my ipod, but still..I listen to it more than their actual “Poison” cd. Jodeci had some killer remixes as well for “Baby I’m Waiting” “Come and Talk to Me” amongst others. Good stuff. Enough to get your head bopping or your fists hitting the desk in time with the beat, thinking you are a beat extraordinare.

Oh. Wait. That was me.

Take a listen to these will you? Follow me down memory lane. Before house remixes took over as the “official remixes” for artists..

Bell Biv Devoe: She’s Dope Remix

Jodeci: Come and Talk to Me Remix

Mary J. Blige feat. Lauryn Hill: I Just Wanna Be With You Remix

Groove Theory: Tell Me (R&B) Remix

God I wish R&B was this good again.. But these are just examples of breathing new life into songs. Remember Destiny’s Child? They wouldn’t be where they are today if Wyclef Jean hadn’t remixed “No No No.” And look how THEY turned out. I wish more producers would take a chance and really WORK at the remix instead of throwing Lil’ Wayne or T.I. in there. I mean..put some work into it. You might like what you get.